>

Side Stitch Pain - Myths, Causes, Prevention, Treatment and Alleviation

There is nothing worse that a sudden side stitch pain when you are running, swimming or working-out.

Recent research has suggested that the cause is related to your posture rather than your breathing pattern - a cramp in the diaphragm. Side Stitches are cramp-like painful spasms that hit you suddenly and make you stop you in your tracks, breathe deeply and eventually fade.


While the exact cause or causes of side stitch pain is unknown it has been generally attributed to a spasm in the diaphragm, the membrane beneath your lungs which is vitally important for breathing. The theory or myth has been that you have overworked your diaphragm during a vigorous run or work-out and it begins to spasm. The recommended way to alleviate the pain is to stop running and to take deep controlled breaths.

Discover what cause side stitches, how to prevent them and how to alleviate the pain in this article
Discover what cause side stitches, how to prevent them and how to alleviate the pain in this article. Source: Public Domain

Causes of Side Stiches

Stitches seem to occur more frequently with inexperienced runners and those who return to exercising after a break. Various possible causes have been suggested including:

Conclusion:

Recent research seems to rule out muscle spasms in the diaphragm and a myth. In this study, a device was used to measure muscle activity in the diaphragm when test subjects were experiencing side stitches. The researchers found no signs of increased muscle activity or spasms in the diaphragm when stitches where occurring.A series of studies by Morton and Callister, at the Faculty of Education, Avondale College, Australia supported posture as the major cause of side stitch pain. These study indicate that body type (weight, age and sex) had no measurable effect on the incidence of stitches whereas poor posture, particularly in the thoracic region was a significant cause. the poor posture was related to "slouching" - curving of the spine causing a bowing or rounding of the back, which leads to a slouching or hunchback posture. Side to side curving of the spine during running was also a cause. An excessive inward curve of the spine was not identified as a major cause of the pain.One theory is that poor posture during may 'pinch' nerves that run from the upper back to the abdomen. Another theory is that hunching over when running increases friction on the peritoneum, the membrane that surrounds the abdominal cavity. This friction leads to pain.

This theory has some merit as it could provide an explanation for why breathing deeply may to help alleviate the pain of stitches: taking deep breaths fills the lungs, tends to make you straighten up and no slouch and so improves posture. It may also explain why stitches occur more regularly in 'occasional' runners who may develop an unusual posture due to the strain of the exercise.

Alleviating and Preventing Side Stitch Pain

Alleviating Side Stitch Pain

If the pain appears to be related to improper breathing it is recommended that you try "belly breathing", which is the opposite of what you normally do. When you inhale, push your abdomen out; when you exhale, pull in your abdomen. This is simply the reverse of what you normally do. Taking a series of long deep breaths, and holding your breath for 10 - 30 seconds can also work. Bend forward, inhale deeply, and push your belly out in and out while breathing. Another tip is to treat the pain in a similar way to any other muscle cramp. Try to stretch the cramping muscle as much as you can by changing how you breath. Take a deep exaggerated breath, drawing in the air as quickly as possible. This to forces the diaphragm down. Hold the breath for a few seconds and then push the air out through closed lips to restrict the flow of air out of your mouth to stretch the diaphragm. Bending your body forward can often help you expel air and to stretch your abdomen. Stretching your body up as high as you can, and extending your arms high above your head, and then crouching forward also stretches your cheat area and may alleviated the pain.If you develop a stitch when running, stop briefly and position your hand on the right side of your abdomen and push up and in while inhaling and exhaling evenly. As you run or swim, try to take regular, long and deep breaths. The stretched ligament theory would argue that shallow breathing tends to increase the risk of a stitch because the diaphragm is kept in a raised position and never lowers far enough to allow the ligaments to stretch or relax. When this happens the diaphragm becomes strained and a side stitch can occur.If you can stop the pain it is generally OK to re-start your run after the stitch goes away. 

Avoidance Tips for Preventing a Side Stitch

Most of the advise for avoiding side pain stitch related to not eating of drinking large quantities of fluid before or durng the exercise. Do not consume a large meal in the three hours prior to the start of your walk. Eating large amounts of food especially fatty food, before exercise may cause stress on the diaphragm, may affect the circulation or may stretch the ligaments in the gut area.

Related Articles for Running and Injury Prevention

=> How Do You Stay Injury Free When Running, Training for Events 

=> Best Tips for Jogging and Running with Dogs 

=> Stretching Exercises Before a Run or Workout May NOT Reduce Injuries 

=> Proven Benefits of Short, High Intensity Runs, Walks, Workouts 

=> Tips for Running with Jogging Strollers: Pros and Cons, Stroller Holding Guides 

=> How to Run Faster and Longer by Using your Magic Pace 

=> Uphill Running Training Workouts and Intervals Plan for Speed, Endurance 





Side stitches can affect any one, at any time - learn how to treat and prevent it here
Side stitches can affect any one, at any time - learn how to treat and prevent it here. Source: Public Domain
Many athletes, especially runners, are all too familiar with the pain that sometimes appears around the lower rib cage or side of the abdomen
Many athletes, especially runners, are all too familiar with the pain that sometimes appears around the lower rib cage or side of the abdomen. Source: Public Domain
What are side stitches - what causes them and how to treat them. Get the details here
What are side stitches - what causes them and how to treat them. Get the details here. Source: Public Domain
Learn more about side stitches here is this article
Learn more about side stitches here is this article. Source: Public Domain